Bradley Wiggins as seen by Chenez, the cartoonist of L’Equipe

Bradley Wiggins as seen by Chenez, the cartoonist of L’Equipe

Tyler Farrar, lanterne rousse.
The American is last overall in the Tour de France, 2:37:16 behind Bradley Wiggins. But after 2402km it’s not a big margin.
Cycling is one of the few sports that venerates losers. This is because it is relative. Farrar might be last but that means he’s struggling with injuries and misfortune that would overwhelm most. Consequently the last rider is often the bravest, fighting pain as well as the road.
In the Tour de France the last rider is called the lanterne rouge or “red light”, as if they are the last wagon on a train.

Tyler Farrar, lanterne rousse.

The American is last overall in the Tour de France, 2:37:16 behind Bradley Wiggins. But after 2402km it’s not a big margin.

Cycling is one of the few sports that venerates losers. This is because it is relative. Farrar might be last but that means he’s struggling with injuries and misfortune that would overwhelm most. Consequently the last rider is often the bravest, fighting pain as well as the road.

In the Tour de France the last rider is called the lanterne rouge or “red light”, as if they are the last wagon on a train.

Bradley Wiggins

In the post-stage press conference Wiggins was asked what he thinks about people who point fingers at Team Sky and hint that he is doping.

Here’s his response:

"I say they’re just fucking wankers. I cannot be doing with people like that.

It justifies their own bone-idleness because they can’t ever imagine applying themselves to do anything in their lives.

It’s easy for them to sit under a pseudonym on Twitter and write that sort of shit, rather than get off their arses in their own lives and apply themselves and work hard at something and achieve something. And that’s ultimately it. Cunts.”

Thanks to Twitter’s @richardmoore73

L’Equipe’s headline about Bradley Wiggins, quoting him from yesterday’s post-race press conference. I doubt his home newspapers in Britain opted for the same title.

L’Equipe’s headline about Bradley Wiggins, quoting him from yesterday’s post-race press conference. I doubt his home newspapers in Britain opted for the same title.

What Caused The Crash?

With 25km to go, Alessandro Petacchi took off his shoe covers and passed them to team mate Davide Vigano. Vigano was riding one-handed as he tried to put the shoe covers in his back pocket whilst riding downhill at around 70km/h when, unable to brake, he rode into the backwheel of the rider in front of him, prompting a wave of crashes at high speed.

That’s what L’Equipe says today. I’d add some more context. First, it seems to have come from Danilo Hondo of the same team, although this isn’t mentioned by the newspaper.

Petacchi presumably had the covers to keep his feet dry during the day but didn’t want the extra weight on his feet for the finish, a normal trick for the sprint.

We’d seen the breakaway up the road put on a tight leash, the bunch had closed in almost too quickly. But with the rolling roads and the wind, the bunch seemed nervous already. The wind had got up too, making the bunch nervous, adding even more pressure on the riders to be at the front.

As part of the new sponsorship deal with consumer electronics firm Sharp, the Garmin-Sharp team have equipped the team bus with a Sharp TV… on the outside so fans can watch the racing if they’re nearby.

As part of the new sponsorship deal with consumer electronics firm Sharp, the Garmin-Sharp team have equipped the team bus with a Sharp TV… on the outside so fans can watch the racing if they’re nearby.

Team Sky started Stage 1 of the Tour de France in yellow helmets. This is thanks to a new rule - highlighted above - where the leading team in the race which stipulates all riders on the leading team must wear yellow helmets provided by their team. In addition they get special yellow race numbers to stick on their backs.
The team prize is determined by the overall time of the best placed three riders from each team.
The yellow helmet rule might be new for 2012 but it’s not that novel. In the 1970s and 1980s riders on the leading team wore yellow cotton caps, back in the days before riders used helmets.

Team Sky started Stage 1 of the Tour de France in yellow helmets. This is thanks to a new rule - highlighted above - where the leading team in the race which stipulates all riders on the leading team must wear yellow helmets provided by their team. In addition they get special yellow race numbers to stick on their backs.

The team prize is determined by the overall time of the best placed three riders from each team.

The yellow helmet rule might be new for 2012 but it’s not that novel. In the 1970s and 1980s riders on the leading team wore yellow cotton caps, back in the days before riders used helmets.

Signs of the Tour de France

Signs of the Tour de France

Eric Boyer reaches out to a fan on the final stage of the Tour de France. If you can move your eyes to the right there’s a lot going on in the photo.

Eric Boyer reaches out to a fan on the final stage of the Tour de France. If you can move your eyes to the right there’s a lot going on in the photo.