Richie Porte won the stage in Paris-Nice today but he’s not the first Australian to shine in the race. Here is Phil Anderson winning a stage in 1981.

Roger Lapébie wins the 1937 Paris-Nice but only after the rules are bent to allow to avoid losing time when he crashed.
This crash helped create cycling’s “three kilometre rule”

Roger Lapébie wins the 1937 Paris-Nice but only after the rules are bent to allow to avoid losing time when he crashed.

This crash helped create cycling’s “three kilometre rule

Tags: history

Once upon a time there was a world championship to decide who was the fastest animal between a lion, an eagle, a duck and a crocodile.

The first round was on the land and lion won, with the duck second and then crocodile and the eagle in last place.

In the water round the crocodile was the fastest with the duck second, third place for the lion and the eagle was last.

In the air round the eagle was the fastest, the duck was second, lion third and the croc was last.

The duck was the fastest animal in the world because he finished second three times.

This is the way French TV try to explain how “eternal second” Raymond Poulidor wins the 1965 “Yellow Trophy” for the best rider of the season.

From the ina.fr archives

Fausto Coppi cuts a dash that today’s riders in their branded team-issue leisurewear can rarely achieve
The image is from the book “Coppi – Inside the Legend of the Campionissimo" by Herbie Sykes and you can read a review at http://inrng.com/2013/01/book-review-coppi-inside-the-legend-of-the-campionissimo/

Fausto Coppi cuts a dash that today’s riders in their branded team-issue leisurewear can rarely achieve

The image is from the book “Coppi – Inside the Legend of the Campionissimo" by Herbie Sykes and you can read a review at http://inrng.com/2013/01/book-review-coppi-inside-the-legend-of-the-campionissimo/

In the 1950s French newspapers competed to bring stories first to the public and one part of this involved getting the newsprint from the printing press to the streets of Paris. At the time there was no faster means than the bike. It was athletic and the best couriers were well paid and as fit as any elite athlete.
They even organised formal races amongst each other, indistinguishable from a normal bike races… except for the stack of newspapers on the front of their bike.

In the 1950s French newspapers competed to bring stories first to the public and one part of this involved getting the newsprint from the printing press to the streets of Paris. At the time there was no faster means than the bike. It was athletic and the best couriers were well paid and as fit as any elite athlete.

They even organised formal races amongst each other, indistinguishable from a normal bike races… except for the stack of newspapers on the front of their bike.