Team buses weren’t allowed at the finish yesterday. Nothing to do with the Orica-Greenedge’s crash, instead the location was a scenic cape with little room to park.
Some squads had team cars or camper vans to collect their riders but Omega Pharma - Quick Step had this Monaco-registered luxury motorboat to ferry the riders back.

Team buses weren’t allowed at the finish yesterday. Nothing to do with the Orica-Greenedge’s crash, instead the location was a scenic cape with little room to park.

Some squads had team cars or camper vans to collect their riders but Omega Pharma - Quick Step had this Monaco-registered luxury motorboat to ferry the riders back.

The Tour de France resembles a desert caravan, a “meticulous souk” that’s taken from town to town every day. Today 12km of cables are laid and rolled up just for the electricity, video and communications, one task amongst many.
After yesterday’s bus smash the Tour’s finish structure is fine, although the two engines that hoist the thing into place are damaged and need work. The hydraulics are fine and the alloy structure is damaged by it will be repaired within the next two days.
The structure is provided by Movico, a Dutch company who had to think quickly yesterday with disaster struck and the race was 13km away and moving at 60km/h. It was their idea to let the air out of the tyres.
The info and photo is from Rob Arnold, the editor of RIDE Cycling Review and friend of the Inner Ring.
Follow @robridemedia on Twitter for more info during July and if you’re in Australia or New Zealand check out the Official Tour Guide produced by RIDE.

The Tour de France resembles a desert caravan, a “meticulous souk” that’s taken from town to town every day. Today 12km of cables are laid and rolled up just for the electricity, video and communications, one task amongst many.

After yesterday’s bus smash the Tour’s finish structure is fine, although the two engines that hoist the thing into place are damaged and need work. The hydraulics are fine and the alloy structure is damaged by it will be repaired within the next two days.

The structure is provided by Movico, a Dutch company who had to think quickly yesterday with disaster struck and the race was 13km away and moving at 60km/h. It was their idea to let the air out of the tyres.

The info and photo is from Rob Arnold, the editor of RIDE Cycling Review and friend of the Inner Ring.

Follow @robridemedia on Twitter for more info during July and if you’re in Australia or New Zealand check out the Official Tour Guide produced by RIDE.

Trek’s new blue bikes for the Tour de France are being prepped in Corsica by Radioshack-Leopard mechanics.

The photos are from Rob Arnold, the editor of RIDE Cycling Review and friend of the Inner Ring.

Follow @robridemedia for more info during July and if you’re in Australia or New Zealand check out the Official Tour Guide produced by RIDE.

The best Tour de France website ever? If you can understand the French then the trailer above is for a new website packed with audio from French radio over the years.

http://tour-en-tete.radiofrance.fr/

L’Equipe have released an iPhone/iPad app with hundreds of photos from the Tour de France over the years. They’re arranged by themed galleries. It looks good for now and I’ll try to write full review in time with more info.
If you want to take a look for yourself, search for Images of the Tour – Zoom by L’Equipe on iTunes.

L’Equipe have released an iPhone/iPad app with hundreds of photos from the Tour de France over the years. They’re arranged by themed galleries. It looks good for now and I’ll try to write full review in time with more info.

If you want to take a look for yourself, search for Images of the Tour – Zoom by L’Equipe on iTunes.

It’s been disturbing to learn of the bombs at the Boston Marathon. Some have expressed surprise that a sports event was attacked and others have wondered if it could happen at the Tour de France.

But it has happened before. As the video clip above from 1974 shows, several vehicles were destroyed by plastic explosives planted by GARI, a political group that was active at the time.

In 1987 French police intercepted Basque separatists armed with weapons, explosives and incendiary devices along with a map of the Pyrenees on which the route of one of the Tour stages was highlighted in blue and police believed the race was going to be attacked.

As recently as 2007 two small devices exploded on 25 July on the route of the Tour de France but nobody was harmed.

GARI has vanished and the Basque group ETA has announced a “definitive ceasefire”.

High profile contests and large crowds attract attention, usually for all the right reasons but sadly for negative ones too. The Tour remains a celebration and nobody should be scared to take part in the fun.

The poster for “La Grande Boucle”, a French film due to be released this summer.
The predictable plot features a man in a midlife crisis overcoming challenges to rebuild his life. The story goes that he’s lost his wife, job and more and has only his bike left. He decides to ride the Tour de France one day ahead of the race. At first the project is crazy but people pick up on it, he gets joined by others, crowds applaud him, the media go crazy and even the Tour de France maillot jaune gets jealous of the attention and publicity.
It could turn out to be great… but it looks like what the French call a téléfilm, something that goes straight to TV.

The poster for “La Grande Boucle”, a French film due to be released this summer.

The predictable plot features a man in a midlife crisis overcoming challenges to rebuild his life. The story goes that he’s lost his wife, job and more and has only his bike left. He decides to ride the Tour de France one day ahead of the race. At first the project is crazy but people pick up on it, he gets joined by others, crowds applaud him, the media go crazy and even the Tour de France maillot jaune gets jealous of the attention and publicity.


It could turn out to be great… but it looks like what the French call a téléfilm, something that goes straight to TV.

Albert Bourlon is the oldest living Tour de France finisher. Here he is in 1947 on his way to winning Stage 14 from Carcassonne to Luchon with the longest ever solo breakaway of 253km.

Albert Bourlon is the oldest living Tour de France finisher. Here he is in 1947 on his way to winning Stage 14 from Carcassonne to Luchon with the longest ever solo breakaway of 253km.

All the mountain stages of the 2013 Tour de France, click to enlarge

All the mountain stages of the 2013 Tour de France, click to enlarge